Crimson

Crimson

‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

Amber Bacardi, Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Reprinted with permission from Sony Pictures.

Over 20 years after the original movie was released in 1995, the time has finally come for a stand-alone sequel in the Jumanji franchise. Directed by Jake Kasdan and released on Dec. 22, “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” was one of 2017’s top-grossing films.

Despite its apparent success, upon first viewing the trailer for the action-packed comedy, I was skeptical. At first, I was concerned — like most fans are when it comes to sequels — that this modernized spin-off would not live up the expectations set by its predecessor. As a kid, I had thoroughly enjoyed the original film; I was not bothered by unrealistic-looking CGI, and Robin Williams’ unreplicable charm was a huge selling point for me. However, I found myself pleasantly surprised.

In the film, four heavily-stereotyped high schoolers find themselves stuck in detention. Ditching the board game from the previous movie for a more modern approach, the group of high schoolers stumble across an old video game console, which transports them to the world of Jumanji. The characters soon realize that their only option is to survive and beat the game in order to escape.

Although the first ten minutes are reminiscent of “The Breakfast Club” and give off a been-there-done-that vibe, the movie  picks up the pace after the four main characters are quite literally sucked into the game. The characters become the avatar of their choice. Comical pandemonium ensues. The awkward nerd transforms into burly Dr. Smolder Bravestone (Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson); the athletic jock shrinks into Moose Finbar (Kevin Hart); the self-absorbed and popular Barbie doll becomes stout, middle-aged Professor Sheldon Oberon’s body (Jack Black); and the misfit wallflower is converted into “the killer of men,” Ruby Roundhouse (Karen Gillan).

At first, the obvious stereotypes of the main characters seemed boring and unoriginal. However, I eventually realized this was intentional in order to accentuate the stark contrast between the characters’ personalities and the bodies of their new avatars — resulting in a comedic masterpiece. As the protagonists are forced out of their comfort zones, they begin to take on different perspectives and discover new things about themselves.

For example, through his new abilities as the beefy Dr. Smolder Bravestone, Spencer (Alex Wolff) gains more confidence and learns to be brave, while the shallow popular girl, Bethany (Madison Iseman), learns there is more to the world than just her phone. Although these morals have been flogged to death throughout the years by countless movies, “Jumanji” tells them in a new and refreshing way.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

Before posting your comment, please make sure it adheres to our Discussion Policy:
1. Be respectful to the author.
2. Be respectful to persons mentioned in the article, and to other commenters.
3. Profane or threatening comments will be destroyed.

The full policy is outlined in our Editorial Policy.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

    Opinion

    Maze Runner: The Death Cure, though overdone, hits a home run

  • ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

    Opinion

    M A N I A: Song by Song

  • ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

    Opinion

    ‘The Post’ Piles on the Drama But Fails to Deliver Impact

  • ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

    Opinion

    CAHS Students Discuss Gun Control Controversy

  • ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

    Opinion

    Hamilton: An American Review

  • ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

    Opinion

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi is far, far more than your usual dose of galactic fun

  • ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

    Opinion

    Malech’s “Unkempt Secrets from the War” Teaches Forgiveness

  • ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

    Opinion

    Taylor changes direction too Swiftly in ‘reputation’: The album ranked and dissected song by song

  • ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

    Opinion

    Russian Grand Ballet’s Swan Lake Cranes For Splendor But Loses Its Essence

  • ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements

    Opinion

    Meaningful (Turtles) All the Way Down: John Green Hits Home Again

Classical Academy High School's Online News Site
‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ invites us into a blend of old and new elements